Best Bars, Clubs and Nightlife in Malaga Spain

Bars, Clubs, and Nightlife

At our Hostel in Malaga we know that our guests are looking for authentic experiences and Malaga is proud to be one of the most attractive locations for night live in Andalusia. Literally hundreds of bars to choose from in Malaga. Rivalling any of its ‘big city’ counterparts, Málaga has become one of the hippest night spots in all of Spain. A variety of venues cater to all tastes, ranging from Spanish bars, to clubs spinning dance, techno, and house beats, with a number of hip-hop and reggae meccas and a vibrant gay scene. People are slowly catching on to all the city has to offer after hours.

El Pimpi

El Pimpi is probably the most famous bar in Malaga, an emblem of the city filled with wine barrels autographed by people that you and I don’t know (apart from Antonio Banderas). The highlight of El Pimpi would be the Moscatel wine, which is made on the premises and is considered an unofficial icon of Malaga. It can be bought in a small, medium or large bottles. The thing I like most about El Pimpi is the decor – it’s a large, comfortable building, and the walls are covered with big antique bullfighting and flamenco posters.

Ctra de Almeria, 13

 

La Tortuga

Situated on the waterfront at Pedregalejo, La Tortuga runs as a café by day and a lively cocktail bar by night. The spacious straw-roofed terrace is a major attraction, and its perfect for a sunny winter afternoon or a hot summer’s night. The bar itself is made from tree trunks and the decor is quirky. La Tortuga mainly attracts people in their 20s and 30s and is especially popular with foreign students. The music is varied, but is mostly Spanish disco and pop.

El Pedregal, 48

 

El Jardin

Dripping with elegance on a leafy corner near the cathedral and the Picasso museum, this place is great for people watching and light healthy fare with the added perk of regular live music, including skirt-swirling Latino beats on Thursday nights.

As its name would suggest, the bar is surrounded by some of the city’s most beautiful gardens, and enjoys a stunning location. Built in 1887, the building that houses El Jardin is a perfect example of the city’s architecture.

Calle Cañon, 1

 

Liceo

This place attracts a local student crowd with its thumping music and fevered atmosphere. Set in a grand old mansion with several rooms and vibes to match your mood, this is alternative clubbing at its best.

Comprising of two floors with a reception area and bar at the entrance and two bedrooms with additional bars on the ground floor. The staircase leads to a mezzanine level where you can watch the action down below, and several bars leading off the main floor. The music is usually loud house and this is not a place for the faint-hearted. Original floors and decor add to the intrigue of this club.

Calle Beatas, 21

 

Sala Wengé

Sala Wengé is situated in the historical quarter of Malaga city, on Calle Santa Lucia, and is open on Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 10pm till 7am. Playing mainly house music with guest DJ´s and party nights, Sala Wengé is a great venue for serious music lovers, and is one of the biggest clubs in Malaga.

Different sessions and events are held here throughout the year, and the bar attracts music fans from all over the Costa del Sol.

Calle Santa Lucia.

 

Siempre Así

Siempre Asi offers low lighting and plenty of space for a shimmy on the dance floor. The main music vibe here is Latino with rumba, salsa, and rock also on the menu. A lively bar which attracts a mixed crowd. Popular with lovers of South American dance music and attracts all sorts of visitors from all over the Costa del Sol.

Calle Convalecientes, 5

Top 10 Things to do and see in Malaga Spain

Malaga has it all

From perfectly sunny beach weather in summer and winter (yes, about 24 degrees in the winter months) to a number of museums and other cultural happenings like the Malaga film festival, to a vivid nightlife & bar scene and some great shopping districts.

The Alcazaba

This is a fortified palace that dates from the Muslim era. It’s located in the foothills of Mount Gibralfaro. The Alcazaba and the Gibralfaro Castle are linked by a rocky corridor called The Corach. The Alcazaba is also next to the Roman Theatre, the city park and opposite the port, which gives it a unique and privileged enclave.

Open in Summer every day from 9h30 to 20h, and in the Winter, from 8h30 to 19h.
General admission: 2,10€. Students, seniors and children under 16: 0,60€. Combined entry Alcazaba+Gibralfaro Castle: 3,45€. Free admission every Sunday after 14h.

 

Cathedral

The Cathedral of Malaga is called the Cathedral of the Incarnation (Catedral de la Encarnación) and is located where the Mosque-Aljama stood during the city’s the eight centuries of Muslim rule. Inside there is a vast body of sculptural work, including 42 carvings by Pedro de Mena, Vargas, and Giuseppe Ortiz Micael Alfaro.

There is also a superb organ, with more than 4,000 pipes, that is still used today. It also houses the Cathedral Museum.

Open Mon. – Fri. from 10h to 18h, Sat. from 10h to 17h.
General admission: 4€.

 

Picasso Museum

The Picasso Museum is housed in the Buenavista Palace, a Renaissance building from the 16th century and the most important example of noble architecture from the period. Tirelessly prolific, Picasso painted over 2,000 works. More than 200 works including paintings, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, and engravings testify to the magnitude of his iconic career, from its inception until the last academic paintings of the 1970’s.

Open Tues. – Thurs. and Sun from 10h to 20h, Fri. and Sat. from 10h to 21h.
General admission: 6€.

 

Roman Theatre of Malaga

This theatre was discovered by accident in 1951, after being buried for centuries. Workers renovating the “Casa de la Cultura,” which sat on top of it, stumbled upon this most amazing archaeological discovery.

Open Nov. – March: Tuesday to Saturday from 9h to 19h, Sundays from 10h to 14h30. And from April – October: Tuesday to Saturday from 10h to 21h, Sundays from 10h to 14h30.
FREE!

 

Gibralfaro Castle

The Gibralfaro Castle is a fourteenth-century castle, built by Yusuf I of Granada. It sits on an ancient Phoenician compound which also contained the lighthouse that gives its name to the hill Gibralfaro (Jbel-Faro, or Mount of the Lighthouse).

Today, the castle is open to tourists, and from there you can see magnificent views of the city of Malaga, and, on a clear day the Atlas Mountains across the Strait of Gibraltar.

Open in Summer everyday, 09h to 20h. And in Winter, everyday from 09h to 18h.
General admission: 2,10€. Students, seniors and children under 16: 0,60€. Combined entry Gibralfaro and Alcazaba: 3,45€. Free admission every Sunday after 14h.

 

Conception Historic Botanical Garden

The Conception Historic Botanical Garden (Jardín Botánico-Histórico de la Concepción) is an English-style garden with more than 150 years of history. It’s one of the few tropical gardens that exist in Europe, and home to more than 5,000 plants from roughly 500 tropical and sub-tropical species and a wide variety of palm trees (more than 50 different species).

Created as a recreational estate for a noble family, it became publicly owned in 1990 and was opened to the public in 1994.

Open from April to September: Tuesday – Sunday: 09h30 – 20h30. And October to March: Tuesday – Sunday: 09h30 – 17h30.
General admission: 4,20€. Half-price entry for seniors and children under 16.

 

Carmen Thyssen Museum

The collection includes the main genres of 19th century Spanish painting, paying special attention to Andalusian artists. There are more than 200 works on display at the Villalón Palace, a mid-16th century building, including a series of paintings by old artists, including “Santa Marina,” by Zurbarán.

Then it continues with a section dedicated to Romantic landscapes and costumbrismo, depicting customs and manners with works by Genaro Pérez Villaamil, Manuel Barrón and the Domínguez Bécquer family.

Open Tues. – Sun., 10h to 20h.
GeneralAdmission: €6.
Reduced: €3,5.

 

Pablo Picasso Birthplace

The Pablo Picasso Foundation Museum showcases original works by Pablo Picasso in its permanent collection and during temporary exhibitions. The museum occupies the first floor of the building where the painter was born and lived during the early years of his life.

There are three rooms devoted to the different mediums used by Picasso, ceramics, prints, and illustrated books.

Open everyday: 9h30 – 20h.
General admission: 1 €

 

English Cemetary

Situated in a pleasant garden, this was the first Protestant cemetery in Spain. It rests on a piece of land given by the Governor of Malaga to the British consul in 1829. Here lies the poet Jorge Guillén (1893-1984).

Open Tuesday to Saturday: 09h30 – 14h30. And Sunday: 09h – 13h.
FREE!

 

Malaguetas Beach

Malaga’s beach spot with various bars and restaurants. Take a dip into the Mediterreanan sea, lie in the sun and than go for some fried fish and a beer in one of the many delicious seafood restaurants on the strip.

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